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Down with Empire! Up with Spring!

A revolutionary ecological perspective

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Down with Empire, Up with Spring is a lucid account of the last 15 years of the ecological movement in Britain and the development of their tactics, strategies and vision. Pulled from the British ecological and anarchist journal Do or Die, this work is written in a candid and frank style.

It is both hugely inspiring to those of us involved in ecological struggles here in Aotearoa and provides some quite incredible ideas for action, and it is also helpful in placing these struggles in the context of the general fight against Power and Capital.

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The Day the Raids Came

Stories of survival and resistance to the state terror raids

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On October 15th, 2007 an estimated 300 police raided houses all over Aotearoa New Zealand and arrested people based on warrants issued under the Terrorism Suppression Act. Lives were turned upside down as the police searched for evidence of ‘terrorism.’ This book is a collection of oral history interviews of people affected by those raids and the aftermath: defendants, friends, family, supporters and other people subject to the state’s coercive powers on that day.

The case is the first ever attempted use of the Terrorism Suppression Act, a piece of legislation enacted in response to the 9/11 events in New York and Washington DC. The terrorism charges were not brought, but the people arrested continue to face a long journey to freedom as the state seeks to punish political activists and to reinforce the status quo.

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Why Reject the Treaty

Emily Bailey writes from a Maori-Pakeha perspective: “So why reject the Treaty now? Because for many Maori there never was an agreement to give up sovereignty over ourselves. There was never an agreement to sell our lands against our will. There was never an agreement to pay council rates or otherwise forfeit our lands. And there was never an agreement to give up our tohunga, our reo, our carved meeting houses or our right to rebel against those who raped, beat, murdered and stole from us if we didn’t.”

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Some Justice

Some Justice is a collection of political poems and lyrics by Wellington anarchist punk poet, doctor, musician and songwriter Ken Vicious. It contains more than 50 poems and song lyrics traversing many issues, ideas and events that have shaped the political landscape of Aotearoa New Zealand for the past 10 years. An extensive and entertaining notes section makes the allusions and references clear and accessible.

We’re sorry, this book is out of stock.

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Small Victories

This zine is about small victories. The little moments of resistance, the ones that won’t win you the battle, the ones that give you hope to keep fighting.

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Remains to be Seen

Tracing Joe Hill’s ashes in New Zealand

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On the eve of his execution in 1915, Joe Hill — radical songwriter, union organiser and member of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) — penned one final telegram from his Utah prison cell: “Could you arrange to have my body hauled to the state line to be buried? I don’t want to be found dead in Utah.” Hill’s body was then cremated, his ashes placed into tiny packets and sent to IWW Locals, sympathetic organizations and individuals around the world. Among the nations said to receive Hill’s ashes, New Zealand is listed.

Remains to be Seen traces the ashes of Joe Hill from their distribution in Chicago to wartime New Zealand. Drawing on previously unseen archival material, it examines the persecution of anarchists, socialists and Wobblies in New Zealand during the First World War. It also explores how intense censorship measures — put in place by the National Coalition Government of William Massey and zealously enforced by New Zealand’s Solicitor-General, Sir John Salmond — effectively silenced and suppressed the IWW in New Zealand.

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Rabble Rousers & Merry Pranksters

A History of Anarchism in Aotearoa/New Zealand from the Mid-1950s to the Early 1980s

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Rabble Rousers and Merry Pranksters captures some of the imagination, the audacity, the laughs and the wildness that animated many of the social movements of the sixties and seventies in Aoteaora/New Zealand. During this time, particularly from the late sixties to the early seventies, an astonishingly broad-based revolt occurred throughout the country. Thousands of workers, Maori, Pacific people, women, youth, lesbians, gays, students, environmentalists and others rebelled against authority. Innovative new styles and anarchistic methods of political dissent became popular.

A colourful and energetic bunch of anarchists occasionally played significant roles in these struggles. Anarchists were prominent in the anti-nuclear, anti-Vietnam War, anti-US military bases, commune, unemployed and peace movements. Rabble Rousers and Merry Pranksters is a richly-detailed tale about a much neglected anti-authoritarian leftist current in Aotearoa/New Zealand history.

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Not Afraid of Ruins #2

Partly a travel journal written in Palestine/Israel, partly random thoughts about Palestine, Zionism, Jewish identity, colonialism and stargate SG1.

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Not Afraid of Ruins #3

I spent two months wandering around Europe. Nine planes, twenty two trains, twenty four beds. So this zine is about vegan food, public parks, fancy buildings, trains, books, squats, museums, anarchist social centres, Jewish history, trees, rabbits, seagulls and anxiety.

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Not Afraid of Ruins Spring 2008

A zine about depression, anxiety, capitalism, teen angst and taking care of each other.